Posted by on Mar 14, 2012 in News, Research & Data

If you’ve spent any time at all on Twitter and Facebook over the last week or so, you’ve undoubtably heard about KONY2012. The campaign by the nonprofit advocacy group Invisible Children centered around Joseph Kony, the Uganda warlord and leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, a guerrilla group with a long and violent history that includes the kidnapping of children. With striking and dramatic imagery and Hollywood-style editing, the campaign video presents an utterly compelling message in the age of “social” media: by simply clicking “share,” you can make a difference in the world.

And “share” the world did, the video racking up 100 million views YouTube in only six days (the fastest campaign to surpass that high bar after Susan Boyle did it in 9, and Lady Gaga’s Bad Romance took 18 days). The preliminary YouTube data paints a picture of a youth movement: the video was heavily viewed from mobile phones and is most popular with 13-17 year old females and 18-24 year old males.

The campaign’s seemingly overnight success brought with it a wave of criticism, too, from commentators from around the web who wonder if the message doesn’t oversimplify a complex issue. We recommend Ethan Zuckerman’s critique on over-simplification, as well as this Jenkins & students piece that adds much needed context.

Of course we were curious about the volume and spread of the message from a data perspective. How and why did the message spread so fast and was it truly out of nowhere? What we found may surprise you:

  • Having pre-existing networks in place helped the initial spread of their message. Our data shows dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the US for years. When Invisible Children wanted to promote this video, deploying the grass-roots support of these groups was essential.
  • Attention philanthropy tactics activated celebrity accounts and drew substantial visibility. Invisible Children enlisted the help of their supporters in barraging celebrities to come out in support of the campaign, making it incredibly easy to Tweet at Taylor Swift or Rihanna within two clicks. Once celebrities came on board, the campaign was given multiple boosts. 

The story unfolds in a volume of mentions 

Looking at the Twitter data, it’s shocking to see just how much attention this campaign brought to the subjects of Uganda and Joseph Kony. For example, if we compare the usage of the #Kony2012 and #StopKony hashtags with the #SXSW hashtag which was extremely active over the past week, we see almost 20x difference in traffic at the peaks. #StopKony had 12,000 tweets per ten minutes at the height of the events, while #SXSW only 900.

If we plot out the number of appearances of the words Uganda and Kony we see very similar spikes. With close to zero references of Uganda or Kony on Twitter before the start of the campaign, we see an incredibly steep rise after the video started making the rounds, reaching 25,000 tweets referencing Kony within a 10 minute interval.

Having the Right Networks in Place

Contrary to what many people may think, all of this attention didn’t happen overnight. In looking at the data, we detected that a pre-existing networked infrastructure was already set in place, triggered at the start of the campaign. Invisible Children has already been building an on-the-ground network of young supporters across the United States, activating them all at the same time, as the campaign began. The data makes this clear.

The graph below represents the initial 5,000 users who posted to the #Kony2012 hashtag. Each node represents a Twitter user, while the edges represent their connections, effectively who follows whom. The more red a node, the earlier it participated in using the hashtag. The graph is organized using the OpenOrd layout algorithm which places highly connected users in close proximity, identifying major clusters within the graph.

The data reinforces what we suspect about the organization. The organization’s formal profile (@invisible) is central to their activity, also represented in the graph. In the top-center, we see the Invisible Children founder Jason Russell (@JasonRussell) and other employees  of the organization. We can also see Kristen Bell (@IMKristenBell) who was very much involved with the organization from early on. The most interesting aspects of this graph are the other clusters that appear. These are highly connected groups of users who were posting to the cause from very early on.

When we dig into the profiles that comprise the clusters, we see some fascinating characteristics emerge. Each cluster represents users from different physical locations. The large cluster on the top right includes users from Birmingham Alabama who were some of the earliest to publicize the video. The cluster is substantially larger than the others, leading us to believe that Invisible Children had strong roots in Alabama. Additionally, the hashtag #Kony2012 initially trended in Birmingham on March 1st, a few days before the video was even placed online. Other clusters in the graph include Pittsburgh, Oklahoma City and Noblesville Indiana (see graph below).

This movement did not emerge from the big cities, but rather small-medium sized cities across the Unites States. It is heavily supported by Christian youth, many of whom post Biblical psalms as their profile bios. Below is a wordle tagcloud highlighting the most common words that appear in their user bios. We easily identify prominent words such as Jesus, God, Christ, University and Student.

Attention Philanthropy Tactics

By using specific tactics the organization got a number of very visible celebrities to publicly support their cause. If you scroll down the Kony 2012 website you’ll see the faces of celebrities and politicians associated with the cause. Users are encouraged to click on the celeb image which then props up an auto-generated Tweet that pings the chosen celebrity and asks them to view the video and support the cause.

The outcome of this tactic were tens thousands of mentions generated by users of the site and targeted at celebrity accounts. Ellen Degeneres (@TheEllenShow), for example, saw over 36,000 mentions from different users pleading her to respond to the cause. So did Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga, Oprah and Taylor Swift, amongst many others. Both Oprah and Bieber chose to respond and amplify the cause while Lady Gaga, Jay-Z and Stephen Colbert chose not to.

Here’s an example Tweet posted by Ryan Seacrest after being bombarded by thousands of Tweets:

This tactic obviously worked. Nine celebrities out of the curated list on the website chose to publicly support the cause, drawing substantial amounts of attention. This raises some important questions about the type of tactics used to demand their attention. Is it okay to deploy such tactics to get people to easily ping celebrities? Some services deploy similar tactics that get constituents to call or send messages to their representatives. How is this different?

On the other side of the scale, what are the unintended consequences of drawing attention to a cause one has not completely evaluated? And how can celebrities make the best decision when targeted by so many requests coming from so many directions? Seems like in this case, the loud voice won. Will this type of behavior encourage more to use the same tactics? And how will this change the way celebrities interact with audiences on these platforms?

In part because of celebrity attention philanthropy, over 100 million people have focused their attention to Uganda over the past week. That’s an incredible feat.

The big question is what Invisible Children will do with all that earned attention. We’re certainly staying tuned.

Comments

comments

76 Comments

  1. The Power of Youth: How Invisible Children Orchestrated Kony 2012 « Social Media Collective
    March 14, 2012

    [...] Over at the SocialFlow blog, Gilad Lotan (my partner) analyzed two aspects of the Invisible Children… [...]

  2. …My heart’s in Accra » Useful reads on Kony 2012
    March 14, 2012

    [...] Lotan of SocialFlow has been crunching the data on the spread of Kony2012 on Twitter and has some very interesting preliminary results. (He’s also been at SXSW this past week, so this is an impressive effort, as he’s been [...]

  3. Curated links and videos related to the viral ascent & descent of #STOPKONY | pmmcc | Patrick McCurdy
    March 14, 2012

    [...] visualization on KONY2012 by Social Flow (click [...]

  4. The Grey Man, And Why This Invisible Children Mess Isn’t So Surprising « Mixtapes for Hookers
    March 14, 2012

    [...] be able to find on a map, gained a lot of traction almost immediately, thanks in large part to the Twitter-going ways of Jesus-loving teenagers in Alabama and also Invisible Children’s tact…,* whose opinions on African militarization are suddenly things we are meant to consider [...]

  5. Kony 2012: Whiteness, Social Media and Africa :: racismreview.com
    March 14, 2012

    [...] the mechanics of how this organization was able to pull off this viral campaign, there’s some fascinating data at SocialFlow (the key: pre-existing networks established with Christian [...]

  6. The Kony2012 social network: how a viral video spreads | Melina Platas Izama
    March 15, 2012

    [...] look at how pre-existing networks allowed Invisible Children to get the word out. (h/t @laurenrprather) Source: [...]

  7. Λινξ 5: Πράγματα Που Αξίζει Να Διαβάσεις Σήμερα | θοδωρής γεωργακόπουλος
    March 15, 2012

    [...] Να μια ενδιαφέρουσα ανάλυση για το πώς θέριεψε και διαδόθηκε η καμπάνια KONY 2012 μέσα [...]

  8. Example of a Picture-perfect, Social-based Launch « LaunchPad's Ready-Aim-Fire
    March 15, 2012

    [...] (Interestingly, they start with G.W. Bush and Condoleeza Rice and don’t list Obama at all.) As Lotan points out, these celebrities got pummeled with thousands upon thousands of messages from fans, predominantly [...]

  9. Wide Angle » #Kony2012 and the Elements of Virality
    March 15, 2012

    [...] something that for most Westerners is as remote and abstract as unicorns or the moon. Luckily, some quick and dirty visualizations from SocialFlow give us a clue. First up: a word cloud of the bio fields of early #Kony2012 [...]

  10. Kony Part One – Invest in Your Network : Bright+3
    March 15, 2012

    [...] second piece, “[Data Viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention,” was written by Gilad Lotan at SocialFlow. Full Kony network via [...]

  11. Lessons Learned from #Kony2012 - NYTimes.com
    March 15, 2012

    [...] vice president at Social Flow, the “social media optimization” company, analyzed the data and explained the story with graphs and charts about how it rocketed around the [...]

  12. Kony2012: networks, activism and community | David Campbell
    March 15, 2012

    [...] their elders at times have different news agendas and learn about news in different ways.” # SocialFlow undertook a data visualization (see above) of the first 5,000 Twitter users who posted the #Kony2012 hashtag. What the clustering [...]

  13. Lessons Learned From #Kony2012 | Susan Boyle Fan's Club
    March 16, 2012

    [...] vice president at Social Flow, the “social media optimization” company, analyzed the data and explained the story with graphs and charts about how it rocketed around the [...]

  14. Five for Friday….KONY 2012 Special « thoughtful campaigner
    March 16, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow have done some brilliant work looking at how online networks helped to share the campaign and then the impact of tweeting by ‘culturemakers’, while [...]

  15. H+K Strategies UK's Blog » Blog Archive » Web Curios
    March 16, 2012

    [...] creating the most viral piece of content in history (or, at least, measurable history – and in case you’re interested, this is an excellent explanation of how that happened) but also for raising $15million in one week, nearly half of which will be spent on making more [...]

  16. KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention | SocialFlow Blog « Cannonball Charity Communications
    March 16, 2012

    [...] [Data Viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention | …. [...]

  17. Themendiffusion im Social Web: #kony2012 und #iranelection « Das Textdepot
    March 17, 2012

    [...] Viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention. In: Social Flow v. [...]

  18. Kony 2012: Juggling Advocacy, Audience and Agency When Using #Video4Change : Video For Change
    March 17, 2012

    [...] in places like Birmingham, Alabama, which kick-started the online push this time around (see this informative analysis by Gilad Lotan, which also explains the online strategy, including celebrity engagement, in more [...]

  19. Kony 2012: Whiteness, Social Media and Africa | LA Progressive
    March 17, 2012

    [...] in the mechanics of how this organization was able to pull off this viral campaign, there’s some fascinating data at SocialFlow (the key: pre-existing networks established with Christian youth).What none of these excellent [...]

  20. O fim de uma era para o impresso | FONTESMAGAZINE beta
    March 17, 2012

    [...] a fantastic post, Gilad Lotan of SocialFlow added some deep data to the discussion, showing that the video’s spread relied on pre-existing networks that its [...]

  21. Not So Invisible Afterall « Social Media and Me
    March 18, 2012

    [...] by reaching so many views in such a short time the video was working well.  Research done by Gilad Lotan of Social Flow showed an in-depth analysis of how the video was able to become as viral as it [...]

  22. Community: why the Kony 2012 viral campaign succeeded while yours failed | Online Community Manager
    March 18, 2012

    [...] her article, danah links to the data analysis of Gilad Lotan over at SocialFlow. His work reveals that a lot of the initial buzz generation came from the activation of [...]

  23. קוני 2012: הסיפור האמיתי | חורים ברשת
    March 18, 2012

    [...] אם אתם חוקרי מדיה חברתית, תגלו כיצד טוו אנשי בארגון את רשת ההפצה שלהם בחוכמה, כיוונו בחוכמה לסלבים ומשפיעני רשת דרך העוקבים שלהם, שהפציצו אותם בהפניות לסרט עד שלא נותרה להם ברירה אלא להמליץ עליו, כפי שבדק גלעד לוטן. [...]

  24. Kony 2012: Invisible Scam | Individual Thought Patterns
    March 18, 2012

    [...] they start with G.W. Bush and Condoleeza Rice and don’t list Obama at all.) As Lotan points out, these celebrities got pummeled with thousands upon thousands of messages from fans, predominantly [...]

  25. How a Nonprofit Launched the Most Viral Campaign Ever [CHART] | Inbound 2012
    March 18, 2012

    [...] were prepared: check out Socialflow analysis showing how the campaign was seeded by geographically co-located youth networks on Twitter who [...]

  26. Kony2012 – how they did it | Firetail
    March 19, 2012

    [...] that the secret of overnight success online is long term investment in offline grassroots networks. READ MORE This entry was posted on Monday, March 19th, [...]

  27. Viral video, gone bad: Kony 2012 and the perils of social media
    March 19, 2012

    [...] Jason Russell, were blatant in their intention to use social media to propel the campaign. Analysis of Twitter and YouTube traffic showed how Invisible Children, the charity behind the Kony 2012 [...]

  28. Digital DNA: Monday March 19 Edition | Haworth News
    March 19, 2012

    [...] Almost immediately, counter-accusations arose. Observers pointed out that Invisible Children supported military intervention in Uganda, and had kickstarted visibility of the KONY video by shrewdly using viral networks from previous youth-oriented projects and by encouraging celebrity retweets. The KONY backlash also went viral, and mentions of the movement dropped off from high point soon after. [...]

  29. נאמנים למקור? | PINKEEE
    March 20, 2012

    [...] ממש, יצרה רושם של אותנטיות, ולאחר אינספור כתבות שחשפו אי דיוקים וסילופי אמת כאלה או אחרים, גרמה לאנשים רבים להרהר שוב [...]

  30. The Second Disquisition: Self-Replicating Automata « Disquisition
    March 20, 2012

    [...] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World's Attention [...]

  31. Kony 2012: Zwischen Pop und Propaganda – Eine Analyse | Karlshochschule International University
    March 21, 2012

    [...] fehlt noch ein wichtiges Erfolgskriterium: Der organisierte Netzwerkeffekt. Das Blog Social Flow hat nicht neben der Visualisierung einer Netzwerkanalyse auch interessante Thesen zum Erfolg der Verbreitung über die sozialen Netzwerke. Aus deren, [...]

  32. The RAAKonteur #77 – The best awareness campaign ever and the PM on Pinterest – RAAK | Digital & Social Media Agency London
    March 21, 2012

    [...] Yes, but it needed to bust through the initial ceiling of obscurity to build a critical mass. An excellent post by Socialflow's Gilad Lotan explains how Invisible Children increased the video's chances [...]

  33. the trouble with paternal/imperialist care: some sources on #stopkony | (Making / Being in / Staying in) TROUBLE
    March 22, 2012

    [...] 1. [Data viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attenti… [Social Flow] This post looks at the data to understand how this viral campaign went viral (hint: it didn’t just “happen”) by targeting specific, highly influential celebrities (like Ryan Seacreast…ugh) and by tapping into a network of motivated, concerned Christian youth: This movement did not emerge from the big cities, but rather small-medium sized cities across the Unites States. It is heavily supported by Christian youth, many of whom post Biblical psalms as their profile bios. Below is a wordle tagcloud highlighting the most common words that appear in their user bios. We easily identify prominent words such as Jesus, God, Christ, University and Student. [...]

  34. Das Web als soziale Maschine
    March 23, 2012

    [...] war, brauchen die Wissenschaftler noch Jahre. Immerhin können sie anhand erster Analysen wichtige Faktoren herausfinden. Ein Anfang, doch kein wirkliches Erklärungsmodell: “Wir brauchen viel mehr [...]

  35. 코니 2012 · Global Voices 한국어
    March 26, 2012

    [...] 질라드 로탄(Gilad Lotan): 어떻게 보이지 않는 네트워크가 세계의 주목을 받을 수 있었던가 [...]

  36. Kony 2012 and the art of going viral | the fifth wave
    March 26, 2012

    [...] deeper probe into the character of the Kony network begins to turn up surprises.  Gilad Lotan parsed the first 5,000 posters to the #StopKony hashtag, and found they clustered around mid-sized cities in the South and [...]

  37. KONY 2012: What Made It Work? | POV Blog | PBS
    March 27, 2012

    [...] analysis by SocialFlow showed that, by March 5, Invisible Children had already cultivated a network of high-school, [...]

  38. WebQuest zu Online-Campaigning « Das Textdepot
    March 29, 2012

    [...] Socialflow: Details zur Verbreitung [...]

  39. Viral By Design: Teams in the Networked World | iTAX – tax news
    April 2, 2012

    [...] effects is no accident. While much is made of “emergent collaboration,” Kony2012 went viral by design. The Invisible Children, Inc. team that masterminded the campaign comprised veteran media activists [...]

  40. Week of April 2: News and Sound Media | Think About Media
    April 4, 2012

    [...] with regard to bringing the public’s attention to major world events. You can read more about the analysis of the spread of the Kony 2012 campaign that we [...]

  41. Leveraging Communities for Social Media Success « IPSA @ Wagner
    April 5, 2012

    [...] host film screenings, speakers and other awareness events in their community. Mapping out the first 5,000 postersof the video, it is easy to see the concentration in the deep south and Midwest- places where [...]

  42. Mission From God: The Upstart Christian Sect Driving Invisible Children and Changing Africa | Open Source Thinktank
    April 10, 2012

    [...] campaign in history, largely came from “highly connected groups of users,” according to data analyzed by SocialFlow, a social-network monitoring [...]

  43. Can I “do a Kony”? | Champollion Digital- an independent public relations and public affairs consultancy
    April 12, 2012

    [...] incredible depth of data available has led to some fascinating analysis of the video’s dissemination. Two things are clear: first, this ripple didn’t come from just [...]

  44. Niños Incomodos and Video for Advocacy in Mexico | El Oso
    April 12, 2012

    [...] relative success of De Panzazo only underlines the mega-success of Kony 2012. In just six days the 30-minute YouTube video attracted more than 100 million views. [...]

  45. “Kony2012″ – erfolgreiche Kampagne oder Netzpropaganda? « JBlog
    April 16, 2012

    [...] [Data Viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attentio… If you’ve spent any time at all on Twitter and Facebook over the last week or so, [...]

  46. Monthly news | Gephi
    May 4, 2012

    [...] By @socialflow: KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention [...]

  47. [Data Viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention | SocialFlow Blog « Electronic Communication @ NDSU
    May 5, 2012

    [...] [Data Viz] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention | …. [...]

  48. The Case for Slacktivism « afterkony2012
    May 6, 2012

    [...] viewers that disagreed with the campaign or organization all together.  However, based on the number of positive Tweets and Facebook posts, you can assume that much of the positive following was not followed by an official pledge, [...]

  49. Projektidee: Kony 2012 | Schule und Social Media
    May 9, 2012

    [...] die Analyse der viralen Kampagne durch SocialFlow [...]

  50. The Lede Blog: Lessons Learned From #Kony2012 - World Bad News : World Bad News
    May 9, 2012

    [...] boss during Social Flow, a “social media optimization” company, analyzed a information and explained a story with graphs and charts about how it rocketed around a [...]

  51. Tipps für NGOs Videos verbreiten im Internet - Online distribution
    May 15, 2012

    [...] mentions from different users pleading her to respond to the cause”, schreibt Gilad Lotan auf Socialflow. Denkt aber vorher über mögliche Effekte auf Euer Image bei den Promis [...]

  52. Always Have the Bottle Ready: My reflections on yesterday’s Kony 2012 Panel » words + images
    May 23, 2012

    [...] pulled heavily from the coverage that SocialFlow and Ethan Zuckerman gave to the issue, discussing how social media can help engage audiences, help [...]

  53. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It | AppsPlanner.com Blog
    June 8, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  54. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It
    June 8, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  55. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It : hotNews Indian News | India Newspaper | India Latest News | News From India | India News Daily | Current India News
    June 8, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  56. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It | Circle Social Media Blog
    June 8, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  57. Slate Asset Blog Network » Blog Archive » Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It » Slate Asset Blog Network
    June 8, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  58. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It | Market 7
    June 8, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  59. BizNOB – - Business, Events, wealth and social entrepreneurship news – the BizNOB - BizNOB - - Business, Events, wealth and social entrepreneurship news - the BizNOB
    June 9, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  60. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It | SNID- Master in Social Networks Influence Design
    June 9, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  61. Why Marketers Care About Your Social Influence, part 3 « NetLinked Solutions
    June 12, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and JustinBieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  62. Using Information Cascades to Create Effective Viral Marketing Campaigns
    June 22, 2012

    [...] a constructed social network. To find out how they did it and what you can learn from it, check out this great analysis. Share this:Facebook [...]

  63. Link Bundle for Next Videos | doeyjavis.com
    June 26, 2012

    [...] A really interesting data vizualization of the KONY 2012 video viral sharing tree. http://blog.socialflow.com/post/7120244932/data-viz-kony2012-see-how-invisible-networks-helped-a-cam… [...]

  64. Perils of the Echo Chamber « C-Notes
    July 6, 2012

    [...] attention of this video created a fever-pitch conversation that exposed other points of view. In this moment, we were all brought together to make sense of such a macabre and sensational [...]

  65. tinderspark | Social good and social media
    July 19, 2012

    [...] reported by many analysing the situation, although that clearly helped. If you look at the data, as Gilad Lotan did over at the SocialFlow blog, you see that the pre-existing networks of young Christians sent the video into the stratosphere [...]

  66. …My heart’s in Accra » What would it take to start a gun control debate in the US?
    August 14, 2012

    [...] weeks. Raising attention “ex nihilo” is pretty rare (and Invisible Children did it by leveraging a cadre of youth who were paying attention to this issue for months or years). It’s more common to find a phenomenon that’s attracting attention [...]

  67. Your Social Influence and Why Marketers Care About It | Tech Chatter
    August 15, 2012

    [...] SocialFlow ran an analysis of the social media related to the video and found “dense clusters of activity that were essential to the message’s spread: Networks of youth that Invisible Children had been cultivating across the U.S. for years.” The analysis also showed exactly how important celebrity tweets from people like Oprah and Justin Bieber were in making the video a viral success. [...]

  68. Remember Kony2012? « thoughtful campaigner
    September 19, 2012

    [...] Word of mouth matters – Sophie shared figures from SocialFlow, who found that in the first week of the video being launched that the ‘average’ viewer was a [...]

  69. Three Trending Innovations in Mobilisation, from Greenpeace and its Allies
    October 1, 2012

    [...] Kony2012 video growth charts and this visualization and analysis by SocialFlow shows how many of the IC grassroots hubs and social networks led the way to the [...]

  70. What happened to Kony 2012? - Criminologia
    October 4, 2012

    [...] viral and has gathered close to 93m views on Youtube so far. (more on how exactly that happened here). Invisible Children has some very practical ideas on how viewers can help stop Joseph Kony. Their [...]

  71. A Networked Take on Influence: what we learn from data « Gilad Lotan
    October 8, 2012

    [...] to the spread information compared to a network which are less dense. In the case of Kony 2012 we identified pre-existing communities amongst the initial users who heavily shared the video. These different parts of the network [...]

  72. Fame or authenticity? What’s more valuable for storytelling? « STORYTELLER UPRISING
    October 8, 2012

    [...] merely pressed a button, uploading the original KONY 2012 film, and it went viral, just like that. This article highlights that they were far more strategic; that the organization employed clever networking [...]

  73. NotGD: I <3 Kony2012
    November 16, 2012

    [...] here on those eye-candy photos to kill the bad guys and save the good guys. Neat! Also as stated here, "Nine celebrities out of the curated list on the website chose to publicly support the cause, [...]

  74. 2.0 Tools for Social Research « Bertram Niessen
    December 2, 2012

    [...] KONY2012: See How Invisible Networks Helped a Campaign Capture the World’s Attention (on [...]

  75. Something Good that Might Have Come from KONY2012 | Justice in Conflict
    December 11, 2012

    [...] world, KONY2012 actually went viral before the video was released. Yes, you read that correctly. As Social Flow has observed, Contrary to what many people may think, all of this attention didn’t happen overnight. In [...]

  76. The Viewer IS the Subject: “Kony 2012″ a Year Later – More Has To Happen
    February 2, 2013

    [...] Sullivan at The Daily Beast and Henry Jenkins of Confessions of an Aca/Fan (check him out!) cited THIS analysis by Gilad Lotan while figuring out how “Kony 2012” as became an internet [...]